Counseling Department
Joanne (Sue) Huscilowitc - Director of Instructional Technology and Student Information
Wendy Loddigs - High School Lead Counselor
Anne Kuhlwilm, Secretary
504-5830
Counseling Department
2014-2015 HS Course Selection Booklet
College Resources
Post Secondary Planning Guide for Class of 2015
College & Financial Aid Links
College-Bound Athlete Guide - 2014
College Visits to WIHS
Financial Aid Night Presentation
Local Scholarships
Onsite College Registration
SAT & ACT Deadlines  
Fall Scholarship Newsletter

Career and Technical Education
Community Service Diploma
Criteria for Honors Level and Advanced Placement Courses
Graduation Requirements
HS Counselor Caseload 2014-15
HS Grading Policy
Honor Roll / Principal's List
HS Profile - Class of 2014
National Honor Society
Naviance
Rank in Class
 
 
At the West Islip High School, school counselors work closely with students assisting them to develop their ability in the areas of educational, personal and vocational development. Through individual counseling and group presentations, counselors help students understand their learning strengths and weaknesses, choose appropriate courses, plan for transition to college and careers, and meet personal challenges in a mature, appropriate way.

Listed below are the skills and abilities that the School Counseling Department works with students to promote:

Learning Competencies
1. Understand one’s own learning abilities and how to best apply them.
2. Understand the school environment and what is expected.
3. Understand the school curriculum and the impact course selection will have on future plans.
4. Learn to set realistic goals and develop strategies to reach them.
5. Understand how standardized test results are used and how to interpret them.

Personal Competencies
1. Understand personal relationships and how to establish an independent identity.
2. Take responsibility for personal decisions.
3. Understand and appreciate one’s own capabilities and those of others.
4. Learn how to resolve conflicts.
5. Learn to cope with change and plan for the future.

Career/Vocational Competencies
1. Form tentative career goals and strategies for attaining them.
2. Become informed about post high school educational opportunities and the issues involved in the selection process.

Grades 9 and 10 - Counselors meet individually with students to review course requirements, develop appropriate 4-year academic plans, and acquaint students with various resources available to them.

Grade 11 - Juniors are informed about College Board testing and the college selection and application process. Students will compile a list of colleges to contact or visit as a result of utilizing the Naviance online program. They will be taught what to accomplish in their visitations and how to interview. Course selections for grade 12 will be reviewed. Students will have an opportunity to prepare for the SATs.

Grade 12 - Seniors are given an overview of the college process, including College Board testing, as well as assistance with college applications. An evening program is conducted to assist in the financial aid process. Students not planning to attend college will have an opportunity to attend a job fair.

HS Grading Policy

The passing grade is 65%. There are four report periods per year. Transfer students who are not present for at least 50% of a marking period are given a written evaluation of their progress.

Honor Roll / Principal's List

Averages are calculated at the end of each marking period in order to recognize students for their academic achievement. A student's average is the arithmetic average of all courses except Physical Education. No weighting factor is used.

Honor Roll: A student must have an average between 85% - 89%.

Principal's List: A student must have an average of 90% or above.

Honor Society: To qualify, a student must have a minimum average of 90%.

       

Criteria for Honors Level and Advanced Placement Courses

Criteria for Entrance to Honors Level

Two out of the following:

Final subject area unweighted grade of 93 or better

             ~or~

Performance Level 4 on New York State program tests for two of the previous three years for which scores are available

           ~and~

Final subject area unweighted grade of 88 or better plus teacher's recommendation per district format

Criteria for Continuation at Honors Level

Final unweighted grade of 90 or better
Final unweighted grade of 85 or better plus teacher's recommendation per district format

Procedures

Students will be tentatively scheduled for Honors classes based upon midyear subject area unweighted grades as delineated above.

Final grades will be reviewed in June to confirm eligibility. The district reserves the right to reschedule students based upon end-of-year grades.

Should a student fail to meet the eligibility criteria, any interested stakeholder (parent, teacher, counselor) may request that a hearing be held by a review panel, consisting of the appropriate department head and two impartial teachers appointed by the principal. The panel may deny or approve a youngster's placement in an honors class; however, in all cases the panel's decision will by final.

Criteria for Entrance to Advanced Placement Level:

Successful completion of a prerequisite course at the Honors level

Procedures

Same as for Honors level.

Students who choose not to take the related Advanced Placement examination for a course will have their final transcript amended to read "no exam taken".

National Honor Society

National Honor SocietyStudents are elected to the Honor Society by the Faculty Council. Applicants may first apply as juniors. Any student may apply who has a cumulative average in grades 9 and 10 of at least ninety (90) percent. For this purpose, a student's average is the arithmetic average of all courses except physical education. No weighting factor is used. Successful applicants must have demonstrated qualities of leadership, service, and character as well as scholarship. Students who do not meet these criteria as juniors may apply as seniors.

Rank in Class 

The Board of Education wishes to recognize outstanding academic achievement and shall use a system of computing grade average to inform graduating students of their class standing.
Rank–In-Class and Class Rank Computation
For the purpose of computation of rank, courses are assigned a weight according to their level of academic difficulty. Course weights are assigned as follows:

International Baccalaureate Courses Weight of 1.15
Advanced Placement and College Level  Weight of 1.15 
Honors Weight of 1.05
All other courses Weight of 1.0

Courses applicable to class rank are those that are within the five major academic areas (English, social studies, math, science, and foreign language.) Effective with the 2007-2008 school year, all additional college level, honors and advanced placement courses in any discipline are also counted. 

Unweighted Average
A student’s unweighted average is the numerical average of those courses included in the ranking process. No weight factor is applied. 

Transcripts
For courses taken more than once, only the highest grade received will appear on the transcript and will be used for ranking purposes. 

Rank for College Application
Rank for college application purposes is calculated at the conclusion of the junior year. 

Rank for Valedictorian/Salutatorian/Other Honors
Rank is calculated once again after the third quarter of senior year to determine the Valedictorian/Salutatorian, as well as for any other honors that may be based on rank. 

Transfer Students
To be considered for Valedictorian/Salutatorian a graduating senior must have spent at least four (4) semesters at West Islip High School. A grade conversion chart will be applied to grades of students who transfer from a school which uses an alternate grading method.
 
Dissemination/Notification
The policy on Class Rank will be disseminated to appropriate school officials and will also be published in the student handbook. This policy became effective with the high school class of 2002 and all subsequent classes.

Graduation Requirements 

Parents and students should understand these requirements and make their course selections wisely since the plans made by students at the secondary level are important factors in determining their futures. Guidance appointments may be initiated by either the counselor or the student. Parents may arrange to meet with their child’s counselor whenever they believe it would be helpful.

Summary of Diploma Requirements for Students Who First Enter Grade 9 in 2009

Regents Diploma

Total Number of Units of Credit:  22

English Language Arts - 4 units

Social Studies - 4 units - (including 1 unit of American history, ½ unit of Participation In Government, and ½ unit of Economics)

Mathematics -3 units (may include or Integrated Algebra, Geometry, and Algebra 2/Trigonometry or Mathematics A* and Mathematics B*)

Science - 3 units - (including at least one course in life science, one in physical science, and third in either life sciences or physical science)

Health - ½ unit

The Arts - 1 unit - (including dance, music, theatre, and/or visual arts)

Languages Other Than English** - 1 unit 

Physical Education - 2 units

Sequence Courses or Electives - 3½ units

Mathematics, Science, and Technology (MST): A commencement-level course in technology education may be used as the third unit of credit in science or mathematics, but not both. Also, students may meet the learning standards in technology either in a technology education course or through an integrated course combining technology with mathematics and/or science.

Examinations:  5

Students must pass Regents examinations as follows:

  • Comprehensive English
  • Global History and Geography
  • United States History and Government
  • One (1) in Mathematics (Integrated Algebra, Geometry, Algebra 2/Trigonometry, Mathematics A* or Mathematics B*); and
  • One (1) in Science.

Alternative Assessments approved by the commissioner pursuant to section 100.2(f) of Part 100 may be used in place of the required State assessments.

** A student identified as having a disability which adversely affects the ability to learn a language may be exempted from the LOTE requirements if the student’s individualized education program states that such requirements are not appropriate.

Regents Diploma with Advanced Designation

Total Number of Units of Credit:    22 

English Language Arts - 4 units  

Social Studies - 4 units  (including 1 unit of American History, ½ unit of Participation In Government, and ½ unit of economics)     

Mathematics - 3 units (including Integrated Algebra, Geometry, and Algebra 2/Trigonometry or Mathematics A* and Mathematics B*);

Science - 3 units (including at least one course in life science, one in physical science, and a third in either life sciences or physical science) 

Health - ½ unit

The Arts - 1 unit (including dance, music, theatre, or visual arts)

Languages Other Than English** - 1 unit (plus an additional 2 LOTE units or a five- unit sequence in Career and Technical Education, or a five-unit sequence in the Arts).

Physical Education - 2 units

Sequence Courses or Electives - 3½ units

Mathematics, Science, and Technology (MST): A commencement-level course in technology education may be used as the third unit of credit in science or mathematics, but not both. Also, students may meet the learning standards in technology either in a technology education course or through an integrated course combining technology with mathematics and/or science.

Examinations: 7, 8, or 9

Students must pass Regents examinations as follows:

  • Comprehensive English
  • United States History and Government
  • Global History and Geography
  • Three (3) in Mathematics (Integrated Algebra or Mathematics A*, and Geometry, and Algebra 2/Trigonmetry);
  • Two (2) in Science (at least one in life science and at least one in physical science); and
  • Language Other Than English (unless exempt through IEP or using a five-unit sequence substitution provision)

Alternative Assessments approved by the commissioner pursuant to section 100.2(f) of Part 100 may be used in place of the required State assessments.

*Students may take these examinations to meet diploma requirements while they are still being administered. These examinations are being phased out as follows:

Last administration of the Regents Examinations in Mathematics A is January 2009.

Last administration of the Regents Examinations in Mathematics B is June 2010.

** A student identified as having a disability which adversely affects the ability to learn a language may be exempted from the LOTE requirements if the student’s individualized education program states that such requirements are not appropriate.

Local Diploma

The following local diploma options are available for students who first enter grade 9 in September 2009:   

  • Students with disabilities who score 55-64 on any of the required Regents examinations may earn a local diploma.
  • Students with disabilities who fail one or more Regents Examinations and who pass the corresponding Regents Competency Test (RCT) will receive a local diploma.
  • Students who successfully appeal two Regents Examinations scores within three points of the 65 passing score and who meet the other requirements of the appeals process specified in CR 100.5(d)(7) will earn a local diploma.

Early Graduation

The cumulative grade point average of those students who satisfy their graduation requirements in less than eight (8) semesters of high school study will be computed and assigned a class rank designation in accordance with this policy. Students who elect to pursue an accelerated program of study shall not be discriminated against in the assignment of a rank in class, and in the corresponding selection of valedictorian and salutatorian.

Career and Technical Education

For students interested in Career and Technical Education (CTE), there are a variety of sequences and courses available both in the district and at BOCES. District programs offer students the opportunity to take courses in the areas of Business Education, Family and Consumer Sciences and Technology. District CTE programs are available to students under age 21 in grades 9 through 12. BOCES CTE programs are available to students in grades 11 and 12. Courses in CTE are available to all students without regard to gender, handicap or race. Questions or concerns regarding equality of access to program offerings should be addressed to the following staff members:
    For Title IX issues.....................Bernadette Burns at District Office 893-3200 - Ext. 1559
    For handicapped student issues...Jeanne Dowling at District Office 893-3200 - Ext. 1550
Information regarding opportunities in CTE is distributed to students. However, parents and students interested in obtaining further information concerning course offerings should contact the High School Counseling Office.

College & Financial Aid Links

Scholarship Information from FastWeb.com:
Educate Yourself: College Admissionspdf
Financial Aid Terms pdf

Links:

US Department of Education    Collegeview  
Sallie Mae College Answer    Federal Student Aid  
Collegeboard.com   International Student Info.  
Princeton Review   FAFSA on the Internet  
CIP - College is Possible   Fastweb.com  
Collegenet    FinAid - Guide to Financial Aid  
College Savings Plan Network      


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